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57 posts categorized "Face to Face"

Face to Face: Introducing Mossery

Bloesem Living | Face to Face: Introducing Mossery

We always love stocking products from new labels in our Bloesem Shop and even more supporting young independent brands. When we caught eyes on these beautifully printed notebooks from Malaysian label, Mossery, we thought no further and had to get our hands on them. With their notebooks exclusively sold in Singapore in the Bloesem Shop, we get to know more about the trio behind this fun stationery label in our latest issue of the Bloesem Gazette

Tell us 3 little known facts about Mossery.

1. Our old logo is a chameleon and our latest logo is based on the chinese character - forest 森 which represents our responsibility to make the world a better place. 

2. The tallest member is 193cm tall and the shortest member is 153cm. Venti, Grande and Tall.

3. We spent hours choosing hundreds of samples to get the paper right – so that it feels good to even flip it, smells good and works great with any writing instrument.

Tell us more about the team behind Mossery’s fun stationery.

We are a team of three graphic designers – a designer, a marketer and a printer with a passion to design and make things.

What is the Mossery style and where do you gain inspiration from?

We don’t know what is our style yet as we are still learning and absorbing different inspiration from everywhere. We try to get inspiration from other design disciplines like fine arts or architecture. Our latest batch is mainly inspired by the fashion world. 

Bloesem Living | Face to Face: Introducing Mossery

 More about Mossery after the cut..

Bloesem Living | Face to Face: Introducing Mossery  

Bloesem Living | Face to Face: Introducing Mossery

What is the Mossery Teams background? What were you doing before Mossery?

Jun: After graduating from local art college, I worked in a small design firm specialising in branding & print design. We got to work on corporate and wedding stationeries and brand identities for big to small companies. That was where I learnt about design craftsmanship and print production process. After that I started a company with a friend to work on a travel startup – that didn’t work out but I learnt a lot about life, culture and entrepreneurship and gain a technical skill in coding – which helps in the making of our new website.

Vivian: I was already interested in doing my own business while I was a student – I actually had six Etsy accounts in different businesses, as a student I really had nothing to lose – I sold digital prints, ceramics with my illustrations, digital cliparts, posters and bags. It was fun to explore these little creative projects and pay my rent with it. After school I joined a clothing design company and then advertising agency, and now I work for a publication company designing and directing the creatives for a food magazine. Trying so many different things made me realise that nothing else is as satisfying as working on Mossery. Hopefully in 2015, I would be able to just focus on growing Mossery full-time. I’ll share with you this quote from Nasty Gal’s Sophia Amoruso which I deeply resonated with, “I stopped feeling like I didn’t belong anywhere and realized that I actually belonged anywhere I wanted to be.”

Wai Lam: My family runs a printing business which is passed on from my grandfather to my father who is an engineer. When I left design school, I decided that I would use my design knowledge to run the family business in a different way – to make my own products. Before Mossery, I had a dream of collecting old recycled paper and starting my own paper mill business. I believe the world is running out of resources and recycling is the only way to go. Unfortunately – setting up a paper mill factory is too costly and hard to sustain. Now I live my mission with Mossery as a stepping stone. 

Bloesem Living | Face to Face: Introducing Mossery

Bloesem Living | Face to Face: Introducing Mossery

Describe your creative process in coming up with new designs and prints for your stationery.

First we determine who we want to design it for – what does this group of people love? With a level of empathy, we approach things that they love and get inspiration from there. We imagine ourselves as one of their friends, and ask ourselves – what would we recommend them? For our latest batch of products, we designed it for chic and confident women – and we see what kind of clothes they wear and restaurants they go to. The rest is about exploration of materials, usability and designing the emotion it brings to the user.

We love how close you guys are to the actual production process. How do Mossery products get made?

When it comes to production, we have to communicate very clearly our expectations and vision to our printers as each process involves different people and machines, old and new. We also pop into factories to monitor the whole process from printing, binding, cutting to packaging. We think it is extremely important for designers to understand production and be very involved in the process. We comein between each process to pick out the bad apples for quality control.

If you could do a collaboration with any brand, which brand would be a dream to work with?

Jun: Playhound, a fashion brand from Thailand and Airbnb, a hospitality/travel startup from US.

Vivian: Fun British fashion label Lazy Oaf and Ceramic Maker Makoto Kagoshima (individuals are brands too, no?)

Bloesem Living | Face to Face: Introducing Mossery

What kind of designs and illustrations can Mossery fans look forward to in the coming year?

Basic designs for serious long term users, accessories that supports our core products i.e. notebook casing, cover wise – maybe a theme from the universe - space, galaxies and planets, and a theme from Mother Earth – whimsical animal prints for our fun stationery.

Being a small and independent brand, what are your dreams for Mossery in 2015?

Jun: To make more high quality & awesome products for ourselves and our friends to use.

Vivian: To have a creative studio (with cats and dogs) to make products and grow to reach more people. 

Images courtesy of Mossery.

We want to say a big thank you to Mossery for being a part of the 3rd Bloesem Gazette, The Conversation Issue. We are in love with their beautifully designed stationery and quirky prints... oh and the pugs notebooks had to be our pick! Which is your favourite? Shop them in the Bloesem shop! 

.. Mossery
.. Read the Bloesem Gazette " The Conversation Issue"
.. Shop Mossery Notebooks in the Bloesem Shop

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Face to Face: Interview with Studio Oink

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Studio Oink

Among the many talented creatives we interviewed in the latest issue of the Bloesem Gazette, we had the privilege to speak with the duo behind interior design studio, Studio Oink. We have always been big fans of their styling work and grabbed the opportunity to ask them for their expert advice on home decoration and keen forecast on design trends in 2015.  

How did you guys end up working together in the interior design scene?

When we met the first time in 2011 on the furniture fair in Cologne we felt a big connection between us and when I finished my studies one year ago it was clear to us, that we will work together and set up our own interior studio. Since our childhood we both felt connected to interiors, aesthetic pieces, furniture and craft matters. In my case (Lea), when I was watching a movie for example, I was always interested in the interior and how the interior interacts with the actors. Matthias built a lot of small wooden houses in his childhood; some were in the trees and some in bushes. A lot of things were about a "home" in our childhood, so it was a kind of logical consequence that we ended up in the interior design scene.

What is the dynamics of your partnership? Who does what? 

We have the same "goal" and the same feeling and relation to "aesthetics". I am responsible for the marketing, the PR and even for the acquisition. Matthias is responsible for the technical drawings, the crafted things and all the technical and crafted related questions and works. But if we have a project, we work out together the concept. We both make up our minds and we make some moodboards. On a meeting we fix the basic themes and the colour schemes. After we created the basic mood and the concept, I am responsible for the more detailed moods and the research of furniture and so on. Matthias takes over responsibility for the drawings, so everything goes "hand in hand" and we always work as a team on a project. We never work on a project alone. Its very important to us, to listen to the opinion of the other and discuss about moods and colours and so on.

More about Studio Oink after the cut..

Fine Little Day Apple Poster available at Bloesem online shop.

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Studio Oink

 

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Studio Oink

Many people find themselves overwhelmed when facing the task of decorating their own homes. They know what they like but they find it hard to put things together. What are 3 simple guidelines you would give to them?

Oh, we don’t like that question, because there are no "basic rules" we can give. We know that there are some advices like "use one colour scheme and try to style everything tone in tone" or "try to give a neutral atmosphere some interesting colour splashes". But its not that easy as it seems and we always give the advice to hire a professional, if you are not sure with your interior concept. It seems to be easy to style a home or maybe a set for a magazine, but it isn’t. There are so many parts which should be considered. It depends on the owner, on the taste of the owner and of course on the environment. To us, every project is new, there are no general rules. We create always tailor-made concepts for our customers.

Describe the design scene in Germany. And if you could be based anywhere else where would it be and why.

The design scene in Germany is not very huge, you cannot compare it with the scandinavian or dutch design scene, which is much more bigger. There are some very talented german designers like Sarah Böttger or Aust & Amelung, but they are located in different cities. Of course a lot of people are thinking that the most talented creative people are located in Berlin, but for us it isn’t. There is a big movement in Leipzig now, where Matthias is born, and we are going to move there. It’s a very nice city with a great dynamic and a grounded and honest creative scene. But we don’t like to tie something on a city, it is as we said, there are some very talented designer in different (smaller) cities in Germany, like the jewellery label WSAKE and we don’t have a "creative" city or a community for designers. Its often connected with (big) companies, so there are huge networks between designers (creatives) and manufacturers, but to us, the "real" creatives are working "behind the scenes". If we couldn’t move to Leipzig, we could imagine to live in Denmark (not in Copenhagen!), in Belgium, France or the Netherlands…there are a lot of beautiful cities and places in these countries and we are fascinated by their architecture and their way of life.

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Studio Oink

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Studio Oink

What’s the most common mistake people make when set forth to design their home?

Its the problem, I already mentioned: They trust in design advices and try to "decorate" their home by following some design rules, but they forget to live in their places. For us its essential to create home concepts where our clients feel sheltered and "home" by using second-hand furniture and mix them with personal pieces. We like to see the traces of life in an interior, we don’t like it, if it looks too clean and arranged like in a catalogue.

What’s in store for Studio Oink in 2015?

We are currently working on a big interior design project in Washington D.C., its about an old townhouse, which is already renovated. We are responsible for the interior concept, which means the furnishing, the colour schemes, artwork, flowers and plants and so on. Moreover we are going to stock up our small online shop with some cute handcrafted dolls for kids.

But we also have some other projects in our minds, which we would like to realize in 2015. We will see, we think it will be exciting!

What’s an upcoming trend for interior and furniture in 2015?

Nature and living in a natural and ecological way is still a "trend", even for the next year. For the colour range there will be soft tones, like pale rosé or pale mint for furniture and wall colours, but even darker soft tones will be in fashion. Moreover the scandinavian way of life will stay popular. I am sure there will be more ceramic in the interiors in 2015, even in the furniture. I guess there will be some combination of wood and ceramic, similar to the collection Matthias designed in 2010 ( http://www.studiooink.de/raw-materials/).

Images courtesy of Studio Oink.

.. Studio Oink
.. Read the Bloesem Gazette " The Conversation Issue"

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Face to Face: Catch up with Mae Engelgeer

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Dutch textile designer, Mae Engelgeer

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Dutch textile designer, Mae Engelgeer

In the latest issue of the Bloesem Gazette, titled "The Converation Issue", we wanted to delve into the minds of our favourite talents from around the world. Having had a long time crush on her work, we got in touch with Dutch textile designer, Mae Engelgeer, again after we last interviewed her in early 2012. 

Hi Mae, the last time we talked was in May 2012, has a lot changed since then? We’d love for you to update us.

Yes a lot has changed. I think the last time we spoke I had just moved into my first studio space. We were busy developing the ISH. Collection and our presentation for Milan 2013. I think since Milan things went into a more vivid flow, but now (2.5 years later) it’s not quite like that anymore, which of course is a good thing!

What is the first thought that crosses your mind when you wake up?

Is it morning already? And then I think about the things that are on my list for the day, and of course my daughter, getting her ready and to school. Then coffee, I love coffee!

What are your recent designs inspired by? How difficult is it to keep coming up with new collections?

We are working on a more minimalistic collection now. And (I am) very excited, there are a lot of collaborations in the works and I am even working on furniture fabrics! Something that has been on my list for a long time.  

I always have new plans for new collections and I am always thinking of what is next before I present new work, so no. I think at this moment we have a lot of projects running at the same time, so there is always something to continue with or to finish. During the process of one design or collection I easily pick up new directions to continue with. So one project slowly goes over in the next collection. It is a continuous flow from one to the other.

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Dutch textile designer, Mae Engelgeer

More about Mae after the cut..

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Dutch textile designer, Mae Engelgeer

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Dutch textile designer, Mae Engelgeer

Could you share with us 3 of your favourite spots in your city?

I really like this new place called SLA. They have very nice and healthy salads, drinks and it is located close to my house which is in the old south of Amsterdam, called De Pijp. I also really enjoy the North of Amsterdam, near the NDSM warf. There is a lot going on there. Good spots for drinks and hangouts. The Stedelijk Museum, which is new and really has international allure and great exhibitions. I am very happy they sell my collection in the Museum Shop.

What is a normal day in the life of Mae Engelgeer?

I think it’s quite busy. Being a mom and having a career that takes a lot of time. So what is normal: Waking up, breakfast with my daughter, then getting her to school. Then I cycle to the studio which is in the East of Amsterdam, overlooking the canals, which I really love.  

Then coffee and starting up the computers, reading some emails and catching up with the intern(s) to discuss the projects to work on. Maybe 1-2 appointments or preparing for the textile lab if we have an appointment scheduled for that week. Working on different project. Trying to finish my “to do list” which I always make but hardly ever finish because there are always things coming up during the day or things take longer than expected. I think I always want to do more than the hours that I have in a day. But I think this is normal when you are running your own studio, it is never finished. Then (I will) see if we have to order or ship production. In between there might be some phone calls, and emails. Actually this continues the whole day, if not on my computer then I read them on my phone. Then home, family time and later in the evening I often end up behind the computer again.

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Dutch textile designer, Mae Engelgeer

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Dutch textile designer, Mae Engelgeer

Is there a piece of advice you would share with budding designers who are still in school or thinking of quiting their day job?

Follow your dream, work hard and just go for it.

What comes to mind when you think of the term “success”. Do you feel you have achieved it?

Well, what is success? I am of course very thankful for where I am and what I do as a textile designer at this point, but there are still a lot of things on my list to do or achieve. At the same time I am also very happy looking back.

Bloesem living | Conversation Issue: Bloesem Gazette - interview with Dutch textile designer, Mae Engelgeer

When you look back at your very first collection, how do you feel? 

This was the Bow collection. I look at it in a few different ways. On one hand, it was the start of my work as a textile designer and it got picked up by several design stores. And on the other hand, I am happy my style changed into a more graphic and modern signature style.

Finish this sentence -- "If I could, I would..."

If I could, I would go to NYC directly!

Images courtesy of Studio Mae Engelgeer.

We want to say a big thank you to Mae for being a part of the 3rd Bloesem Gazette , The Conversation Issue. We are big fans of her work and can't wait to see more from this great design talent. In the meantime, we're happy to sell Mae beautiful creations in the Bloesem shop.

.. Mae Engelgeer
.. Read the Bloesem Gazette " The Conversation Issue"
.. Shop Mae Engelgeer teatowels in the Bloesem Shop

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Julie Lansom

Bloesem Living | Face to Face with designer Julie Lansom
 
Not too long ago, we fell for the Sputnik Lamps by Julie Lansom. Intrigued by the exquisite detail of the lamps and amazing colors and shapes they came in, we wanted to get to know the designer behind these beautiful creations. Julie studied journalism at school but followed her heart to create objects - which she loves doing. Read on as we get to know more about her and her favourite spots in Paris
 
Bloesem Living | Face to Face with designer Julie Lansom
 
 Bloesem Living | Face to Face with designer Julie Lansom
 
A short description of yourself and what you do.
I was born in the South of France and now live in Paris, I build objects and I take photos. I haven't studied design or photography at school so my approach to both of them is very simple and intuitive. My dad is an Art dealer so I grew up in the middle of objects. I always had a thing for them and I always liked building things with my hands. I studied journalism at University though, maybe because I wanted to do something that matters. I have worked for some magazines, and I still do sometimes. But I guess it is quite logical that I'm back to making things. It kind of actually makes more sense when I look at my life.
 
Could you share with us 3 of your favourite spots in your city?
First of all, I really love my home, this is a little flat that I share with some friends where there is paint, yarn, lamps and cardboard boxes everywhere and it makes me feel well. This is exactly like in my head. 
In Paris, I really like a little café called "Saint Gervais", right next door. it has a really small terrace where I could spend hours and the atmosphere is just the Paris that I like. Otherwise, some of my friends from the South of France opened a really cool place in the 11th arrondissement, "Les Niçois", where you can eat meditarranean food and play pétanque. This is a lovely spot to hang out.
 
Are there any design hangouts or places you can go to meet other creates where you live?
Probably a lot but I like to think that you can meet creative and interesting people everywhere. I don't like the idea of going out to places where you're going to meet people that you deem interesting because they are like you. What does that mean exactly? Some of the most creative people that I know have jobs that are not exactly "creative". Creativity has a lot of different aspects. I hang out in very different places where I hope I'm going to meet very different people. 
 
Bloesem Living | Face to Face with designer Julie Lansom
 
Bloesem Living | Face to Face with designer Julie Lansom
 
What is one important lesson you have learnt on your creative journey?
Do what you love to do and don't take yourself too seriously. This is the only way to be happy.
 
Is there a piece of advice you would share with budding designers who are still in school or thinking of quiting their day job?
I'm not sure I can give them any advice. They probably know much more stuff about design than I do. They should just also do what they love to do! 
 
Do you remember the moment you decided you wanted to do what you are doing now?
I guess I always wanted to do that but it took me a while to realize that this is exactly what was going to make me happy. 
 
Bloesem Living | Face to Face with designer Julie Lansom
 
Bloesem Living | Face to Face with designer Julie Lansom
  
Where do you find inspiration? Perhaps a favourite blog or website?
My Sputnik lamps are inspired by a kind of lamp that has been made since the 1960s. It had this notch system but was made of bad materials, and had bad colors and sad shapes. I thought that I could do something with this idea and I started working on the Sputnik lamps. They are inspired by the retro-futuristic spirit of the first satellites sent into space, science fiction books, and more generally the graphical 1960s and 1970s aesthetics. But I try to make a very modern object by working on the shapes and colors. 
 
Inspiration can be found anywhere though and I really believe that you are inspired everyday by everything that surrounds you and everyone you meet or just see. It can be nature, a film, the city, a dog, a book, a car, a feeling or a smell. You usually don't even realize it when it's happening, it's almost subconscious. It is all a question of sensitivity.
 
Photography is also a great inspiration. I have a blog called "Straight out of camerawhere I gather the works of young photographers around the world. We're about to publish our first book (out in october 2014). I spend hours and hours every week digging through the websites of all those young photographers and this is very inspiring. 
 
- Finish this sentence -- "if we could, we would..."
It's looking at the problem the wrong way! If you really want, you can. 
 
Bloesem Living | Face to Face with designer Julie Lansom
 
Bloesem Living | Face to Face with designer Julie Lansom
 
First image taken by Amandine PaulandréAll other images taken by Julie Lansom.
 
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Our neighbors

Bloesem Living | Home of the Choo family, Tiong Bahru Singapore

Please meet some of our creative neighbors ... The Choo Family!

Singapore photographer Franz (who we first introduced to you here) visited their wonderful home right opposite the Bloesem Creative Space.  The great thing about the Tiong Bahru estate is that we are around all these other talents, we just love the atmosphere here. It's always a delight bumping into Pern, Innika and the most adorable Eadie Bo, while we are out in the neighbourhood grabbing supplies or lunch. They are such a sweet family!

Bloesem Living | Home of the Choo family, Tiong Bahru Singapore

Bloesem Living | Home of the Choo family, Tiong Bahru Singapore

Bloesem Living | Home of the Choo family, Tiong Bahru Singapore

Bloesem Living | Home of the Choo family, Tiong Bahru Singapore

Bloesem Living | Home of the Choo family, Tiong Bahru Singapore

Franz and his team, Melody, Hosanna and Gil are always looking for nice houses Singapore so feel free to drop them a line if you have any sugestions. 

Email: franz@lilreddotfolks.com.

.. lilreddotfolks
..The Choo Family 

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Just 2 of us (& our 7 pets)

Bloesem Living | Home of Pet Lovers, Ann and James

Another edition of Lil Red Dot Folks. This is Ann and James, animal advocates living in Yishun, Singapore. Their beautiful home is inhabited by themselves along with 7 other much furrier friends, Dasher the dog, Eet and Mathy the cats, Meatball and Mac Jr. the guinea pigs, and Effie and Appie the gerbils. (How they keep their home in such tip top shape is just baffling to me.)

Bloesem Living | Home of Pet Lovers, Ann and James

Bloesem Living | Home of Pet Lovers, Ann and James

Bloesem Living | Home of Pet Lovers, Ann and James

Bloesem Living | Home of Pet Lovers, Ann and James

Bloesem Living | Home of Pet Lovers, Ann and James

Bloesem Living | Home of Pet Lovers, Ann and James

Bloesem Living | Home of Pet Lovers, Ann and James

We love how their house is not totally minimal and empty but everything has it's place and all thir things are so beautifully arranged, especially on the shelves.

For more homes to be jealous of, look here and here.

 .. Lil Red Dot Folks

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